T-Mobile Drops Upfront Costs for iPhone, Galaxy, and Other Top-Shelf Phones

The carrier will drop the upfront payment on several elite phones and allow users to spread the costs over two years.

T-  Mobile

Beginning tomorrow, T-Mobile will offer several of its elite handsets for zero down. The "deal" allows users to forgo any upfront costs on the phone and spread it out over two years as part of their monthly payment.

For example, right now, you can pick-up a Samsung Galaxy S3 on T-Mobile's site for a $50 upfront payment followed by $20/month for two years. The new zero-down plan would allow you to pick up the same phone for no downpayment, but will run cost $22/month for two years.

I'm no math genius, but the extra $2 a month for 24 months comes out to $48--that's $2 shy of the original $50 upfront cost. So, the new plan will actually save you $2 over two years! You can use those 200 pennies to buy a soda to celebrate! (Or put it towards that $35 Chromecast you've been eyeing ever since Wednesday).

Taking a break from being a jerk for a moment, there is a specific demographic that T-Mobile probably has in mind with this deal. The carrier's PR release introduced the deal as being "in time for back-to-school," so the lowered bar to entry may entice minimum wage working teens who slaved away over a McDonald's grill all summer to save up for the hottest new handset, or anyone else who can pony up $2 extra per month for months to come but would have a hard time plunking down $50 in one go.

The phones included in the zero-down deal are the SonyA Xperia Z, AppleA iPhone 5,A Nokia Lumina 925 andA 521,A Blackberry Q10,A HTC One, the SamsungA Galaxy S3,A S4, andA Note II, and one tablet: the SamsungA Galaxy Tab 2 10.1.

I'm sure that T-Mobile is hoping to entice some customers into throwing in an additional $10 per month for the company's Jump plan that allows users to forgo an upgrade fee to switch up to the hottest new phones as they come along, too.

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