Microsoft Cuts Deal to Deploy Oracle Database, Weblogic & Java as Azure Cloud Services

Businesses, and developers in particular, that want to deploy Java, Oracle Database and Oracle Web Logic Server in the public cloud can now do so thanks to an agreement between Oracle and Microsoft's Azure cloud service.

Businesses, and developers in particular, that want to deploy Java, Oracle Database and Oracle Web Logic Server in the public cloud can now do so thanks to an agreement between Oracle and Microsoft's Azure cloud service.

Microsoft and Oracle have teamed up so their cloud platforms and applications support each other, enabling businesses to deploy Oracle apps and databases in hybrid cloud scenarios.

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The agreement means that Oracle software that already runs on Windows Server will also run on Windows Server Hyper-V and in Azure. So using Oracle licenses, customers can run Oracle WebLogic Server and Oracle Database in Azure and still receive Oracle support, says Satya Nadella, president of Microsoft's Server & Tools business.

Customers who don't have Oracle licenses will be able to buy preconfigured instances of Oracle Database and Oracle WebLogic Server in the Azure cloud "in the near future," Nadella says in a blog. These will be what Microsoft describes as popular configurations of the software. Microsoft will offer licensed and supported Java in Azure, and Oracle will offer preconfigured instances of Oracle Linux and a range of Oracle software, also within Azure.

As a lure to developers, both companies pledge to add fully supported Java into Azure for customers with appropriate licenses, he says. Details about licensing Oracle software for cloud use can be found here.

The package could benefit thousands of Oracle customers and enable millions of developers to deploy needed resources in the cloud to augment their own infrastructure, he says.

"The deal came as part of a Java licensing agreement by Microsoft for Windows Azure, which should help Redmond increase the appeal of its public cloud to a broader developer audience," says Forrester analyst James Staten in a blogabout the announcement.

Microsoft has been pushing its hybrid cloud architecture to developers in particular because they have a need for flexible infrastructure that they can turn on and off as projects and testing ebb and flow. Java and .Net are the number two and number three languages used by cloud developers behind HTML/Javascript, Staten says.

"Bring-your-own-license-terms aren't ideal in the per-hour world of cloud platforms, so the pay-per-use licensing arrangements are key to Oracle's cloud relevance," Staten says.

From Oracle's perspective the deal is a break from the company's mantra that Oracle software on Oracle hardware is the way to go, he says, but the company acknowledges the need to support cloud services its customers also use, he says. Oracle already has a similar deal with Amazon Web Services, albeit for a different set of Oracle products.

"Certainly Oracle would prefer customers build and deploy their own Fusion applications on the Oracle Public Cloud but the company is wisely acknowledging the market momentum behind AWS and Windows Azure and ensuring Oracle presence where its customers are going," Staten writes. "These moves are also necessary to combat the widespread use of open source alternatives to Oracle's middleware and database products on these new deployment platforms."

Tim Greene covers Microsoft and unified communications for Network World and writes the Mostly Microsoft blog. Reach him at tgreene@nww.com and follow him on Twitter@Tim_Greene.

Network World senior writer Brandon Butler covers cloud computing and social collaboration. He can be reached at BButler@nww.com and found on Twitter at @BButlerNWW.

This story, "Microsoft Cuts Deal to Deploy Oracle Database, Weblogic & Java as Azure Cloud Services" was originally published by Network World.

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