SolidWorks Talks About What’s Next in 3D Design

Simulation, parallel development, built-in collaboration and 3D printing help further streamline product development.

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Time to market is a key driver in many industries, and 3D design tools have helped tremendously by giving developers a better feel for what they are building. But that was only the start. For an update on this fast changing field, Network World Editor in Chief John Dix caught up with Aaron Kelly, VP of User Experience & Product Portfolio Management at SolidWorks, a division of Dassault Systems.

Let’s start with a little background on the evolution of SolidWorks. Give us the story.

Dassault Systems has been in the 3D software design business for years, but what SolidWorks did in 1995 was make the technology available to more people by running on Windows. Our price point was lower and our functionality was geared towards the mainstream as opposed to more complex things like cars and planes and ships. So we were able to reach a broader audience with the power of 3D, which helps people better understand how parts fit together. Pretty soon everyone was able to get their products designed faster.

But we also support what’s called top-down design, meaning we could automate changes. So if a designer in Cubicle A made a change, the designer in Cubicle B could have that change automatically update his design. So that was another revolutionary step. That enabled people to make changes faster, get their products to market even faster.

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