Data held hostage; backups to the rescue

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Some ransomware travels quickly from one computer to the entire network. The bad guys are moving fast nowadays.

Last year, I wrote about a ransomware infection that encrypted the hard drive of one of my company’s employees. In that situation, a live, in-person scammer called the employee, claiming to be from “technical support,” and tricked the employee into visiting a website that infected his computer. As with a similar situation I wrote about in 2012, the infection came from an advertisement on the front page of a major news service’s website. The website runs rotating ads, one of which was compromised and hit the victim with a drive-by malware infection (without any intervention by or even the knowledge of the victim). I thought that because the infection was on the victim’s personal computer, not on my company’s network, we were pretty safe. I thought that if it had been on my network, the attempt probably would have failed, or would at least have been detected right away.

As it turns out, I was both right and wrong. I encountered ransomware again, this time on my company’s network, and this time it did some damage.

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