8 LinkedIn users we love to hate

If you're a regular LinkedIn user, you've probably encountered the dreaded Spammer, the way-too-friendly Stranger and the starry-eyed Trivialist. Here's a look at eight annoying characters that are hard not to hate on LinkedIn.

01 intro title
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People we love to hate on LinkedIn

Some social media platforms try to be everything to everyone, but LinkedIn is different. The service offers a lot of features to its 364 million registered members, but it's also uniquely focused and specifically tailored for working professionals. The eight people we love to hate the most on LinkedIn share similarities with folks who annoy us on social media in general, but it is the useless mix of personal and professional on LinkedIn that drives us batty.

If you see yourself in any of these terrible characters, take a lesson from the following slides, consider the common mistakes these people make and then take action to reserve your course. If you recognize any of these people in your current set of LinkedIn connections, don't jump to conclusions and immediately disconnect. However, if the time comes when you have no choice but to cull these characters we recommend swift and decisive action.

02 the spammer
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The LinkedIn Spammer

The LinkedIn Spammer may be the single most annoying person on all of LinkedIn. She doesn't care about your time, your genuine interests or the goals you set for yourself on the site. She toils in the misery of others, spamming every LinkedIn user she can reach with misguided promotions and random ads for the latest and not-so-greatest products and services. The Spammer reminds you of everything that's wrong with the Internet by subjecting users of one of the Web's few social networks designed for professionalism to her selfishly senseless pursuits.

03 the stranger
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The Stranger on LinkedIn

You've likely encountered the Stranger at some point during your time on LinkedIn. He's the guy you know you don't know, and it's unclear why he wants to connect but still sends you a request. You know you never worked or associated with him, and he surely isn't a personal friend. The Stranger might have meaningful motives for trying to connect on LinkedIn, but what differentiates him from the people you meet and recognize on LinkedIn is his unwillingness to explain why he wants to connect with you in the first place.

04 the braggart
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The LinkedIn Braggart

The LinkedIn Braggart is no different than the conceited know-it-alls you meet in other social circles — real and virtual — but he takes his craft to new levels on LinkedIn. He lacks vocabulary, humility, gratitude and empathy. The Braggart never takes the opportunity to thank, or even think, of others because he's too busy stroking his own ego. The Braggart may be rich, wildly successful and a sought after talent, but his LinkedIn connections sure aren't impressed with his braggartocious ways.

05 the taker
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The LinkedIn Taker

If it's better to give than to receive, the Taker wants no part. He is the LinkedIn user who regularly asks you for help, advice or referrals but never offers anything in return. Often Takers won't even thank you for your time and effort after you help them. He simply takes, and then takes some more, from a community designed to benefit and grow based on its members' contributions and reciprocity. The Taker also unfortunately has many targets on LinkedIn because it's simple to reach so many people who are ready to selflessly share their time and advice.

06 overzealous recruiter
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The Overzealous LinkedIn Recruiter

It's hard not to get excited when a recruiter reaches out on LinkedIn, especially when the position they're trying to fill seems like a good fit. However, beware the Overzealous LinkedIn Recruiter, who makes a habit of overpromising and under delivering on what may seem like career-defining moments. The Overzealous LinkedIn Recruiter is sometimes so desperate to fill a position that he widens his net and snags professionals who clearly don't fit the bill or are dramatically under qualified — two situations that never end well for either party.

07 the downer
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The LinkedIn Downer

There's always a LinkedIn Downer lurking a click away. In his defense, the LinkedIn Downer simply can't help himself; he gets too much joy and satisfaction from wallowing and complaining about everything. He abruptly brings meaningful conversation on LinkedIn to a halt with negativity and endless glass-is-half-emptiness. The LinkedIn Downer never bites his tongue or holds something in because he loves bringing everyone down. Misery loves company on social media sites, and the LinkedIn Downer loves to share all the dirty details of his life unfulfilled.

08 the trivialist
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The LinkedIn Trivialist

You can blame the LinkedIn Trivialist for all those insipid inspirational quotes, quizzes and other pursuits that are better suited for Facebook than a professional social network. He lacks all sense of decorum in the LinkedIn environment and generally treats his professional network to the same garbage he aimlessly spews on Snapchat and Twitter. The LinkedIn Trivialist shares everything he reads in the most annoying possible ways. He also seemingly assumes that everything he reads online is true, which may help explain why your feed is overrun with conspiracy theories, rumors and lies.

09 lost and confused
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LinkedIn's Lost and Confused

It's easy to get disoriented on LinkedIn, especially if you're new to the service, but most users quickly find their way. The LinkedIn Lost and Confused never get their sea legs, possibly because they're too worried about fitting in or because they have no real reason to be there in the first place. The patterns and behaviors of LinkedIn's Lost and Confused are all over map. One minute they want to connect with as many people as possible, the next they're firing off InMail messages just to say hello or joining completely random group discussions. The Lost and Confused could just need a helping hand — not all who wander are lost — so the best way to deal with them can be to educate, encourage and direct these lost souls to more relevant objectives.