Testing suggests that not even identical twins can dupe Windows Hello

windows hello
Credit: Microsoft

If The Australian's testing is any indication, you shouldn't have to worry too much about your evil twin or doppelganger unlocking your PC using Windows Hello.


Windows Hello, the feature in Windows 10 that lets you use your face as your login password, so to speak, may seem like a mere novelty at first glance, and something that could potentially be readily fooled. Journalist Chris Griffin with The Australian wanted to find out for himself, so he brought in six pairs of identical twins to put Windows Hello to the test.

The result? In each of the six cases, Windows Hello kept each twin from logging in as their identical siblings. 

To run the test, Griffin used a webcam-equipped Lenovo ThinkPad notebook, and had one twin from each pair set up a login account and configure Windows Hello to recognize their face. He would then have the other twin attempt to log into the first twin’s account. Windows Hello successfully kept the imposter twin out in each case, even if the second twin wore their hair like the first twin or removed their glasses.

Windows Hello wasn’t without problems in The Australian’s experiment. In some cases, it wouldn’t recognize faces right away, and in one case, it wouldn’t work at all, so if you give Windows Hello a go, you may run into similar difficulties. Still, it’s reassuring to see that Windows Hello can keep impostors out, even if it doesn’t always pick up faces. Visit The Australian for 

This story, "Testing suggests that not even identical twins can dupe Windows Hello" was originally published by PCWorld.

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