The holy grail of digital transformation: Improved employee efficiency

How three organizations delivered digital initiatives that help people close deals faster, reduce paperwork and get the most out of their workdays.

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As organizations embrace digital technologies to transform their businesses, one key metric sits clearly in their sights: Employee productivity.

Improving worker efficiency is considered table stakes for modern companies looking for an edge over the competition, and productivity is a measure that speaks volumes about a business's health.

For three organizations, winners of IDGE's Digital Edge 25 awards, a desire to improve employee productivity was the driving force behind their innovative projects. One helps companies deploy personnel more efficiently and better manage supplies, another helps field workers reduce paperwork, and the third enables salespeople to close deals more quickly.

Kimberly-Clark: Building a better bathroom

The idea of an intelligent restroom that would know when it needed a good cleaning or could initiate the process of replenishing supplies such as paper towels had long been on the wish list of Kimberly-Clark's professional division, which sells restroom products and accessories to building owners and facilities management companies.

Instead of just selling supplies, the company wanted to offer a service to its customers, to help them deal more efficiently with the ongoing challenge of keeping restrooms properly stocked and cleaned. Building managers are constantly peppered with patron and tenant complaints about missing items or dirty facilities. Such complaints pile up in part because of the inefficiencies of manual upkeep processes, in which employees go from restroom to restroom to clean and perform routine maintenance tasks without any insight into what to expect when they get there.

"We did an evaluation to look for potential opportunities and ways we could disrupt the competition," says Jennifer Sepull, Kimberly-Clark's CIO. "The question became what could we offer building management teams so they would come to our total solution because we helped them manage operations better."

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