Skype for all: Microsoft lets users send direct links to chat with anyone via Skype

Now you can Skype without Skype, but Microsoft hopes you'll stick around.

skype call
Credit: Microsoft

For millions, Skype remains the go-to VoIP app for messaging and communication. But millions more use WhatsApp or Google Hangouts or another solution. For them, Skype has a new option: initiating a Skype session via a direct link.

It’s pretty simple: Users of Skype for Windows, Skype for Mac, or Skype for the Web will soon be able to send friends a link. Once they accept it, they’ll be able to launch Skype from the web and join the conversation. Also, if you have a Skype name and a Skype mobile app, you can share a conversation link from Skype for iPhone, iPad and Android just by clicking the link.

Skype said the new link-sharing feature should be live now within the United States, and should be live throughout the rest of the world in a few weeks. Sharing a mobile conversation will be added “soon,” Microsoft said.

Skype has already added features, such as its universal translator, in a bid to lure users to the Skype app. It's also added conveniences to its Web apps, to entice users to adopt Office. If you use Outlook.com, for example, and receive a Word file, it will open in the Word Online app.

Why this matters: Microsoft hasn’t specified the number of Skype users it has—only that Skype users talk for 3 billion minutes per day. But it’s clear that a number of other mobile apps have challenged Skype’s supremacy. What Skype has done is pretty trivial on one level, but it’s a convenience that could convince users to stay.

This story, "Skype for all: Microsoft lets users send direct links to chat with anyone via Skype" was originally published by PCWorld.

To comment on this article and other CIO content, visit us on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.
Related:
Download the CIO October 2016 Digital Magazine
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.