Open vSwitch becomes a Linux Foundation Collaborative project

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Credit: Sarah Deer/Flickr

The Linux Foundation has bagged another open source networking project. The open source virtual switch Open vSwitch (OVS) has become a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.

Just a few weeks ago CORD(Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter) became a Linux Foundation project, joining other open source networking projects, including the SDN platform OpenDaylight and the SDN network operating system ONOS.

“Having been involved with the OVS project since 2012, it’s been great to see OVS grow into a truly community-supported effort and a critical component of many of the world’s largest data centers,” said Bruce Davie, Chief Technology Officer, Networking, VMware, Inc. in a statement. “Giving OVS a formal home within the Linux Foundation is a great way to ensure continued investment and community participation in this important open source project.”

Today there are more than 300 contributors across companies including Cisco, Ericsson, Huawei, HP, IBM, Intel, Red Hat and VMware. The project is governed by its own open governance model, like many other Linux Foundation projects.

“OVS is a great example of how open source software has enabled the networking industry to match the pace of cloud computing and help advance virtualized technologies,” said Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin in a statement. “Hosting OVS as a Linux Foundation Project will serve to further collaboration across users and vendors and aid in open technology development throughout the networking stack.”

More and more components of data centers are becoming software defined — from compute to storage and networking. In these datacenters networking functions are increasingly performed by software running on servers, either as part of the application or within a hypervisor. And OVS is one of the major open source projects.

“While the traditional Layer-2 Linux bridge addresses many common networking tasks, Open vSwitch was created with a robust set of features and a high performance design to address the rapidly growing needs of SDN and virtual networking use cases,” the Linux Foundation said in a statement.

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