Frightening technology trends to worry about

Just in time for Halloween: What’s keeping security folks up at night

Frightening technology trends
Spooky

With Halloween just around the corner, what better time to reflect on technology scares in their organization – and, just as importantly, how to combat them. From internal threats to vendor overload, Warren Perlman, CIO of Ceridian, a global human capital management technology company, explains how to confront your “technology fears.”

Frightening technology trends
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Often-overlooked internal threats

Despite the hype of external, malicious hackers taking over a network, the internal threat remains a company’s greatest worry. In fact, a recent study of 276 US CIOs and executive IT professionals commissioned by Sungard AS found that 60 percent of respondents would enforce stricter security policies for employees.

Internal threats can range in form, and pose as several scenarios. The most common is human error: not spiteful intentions, but an honest mistake. Sensitive data landing in the wrong hands via a misdirected email or a simple virus infection caused by a click on a malicious attachment can be devastating for an organization.

Finding and retaining top talent
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Finding and retaining top talent

We’re all aware of the technology talent shortage, and how difficult it is to find quality IT support, software developers, and programmers. However, what’s even more difficult is retaining top talent.

Keeping tech workers happy and engaged will not only help you retain valuable employees, but you’ll also find they remain motivated and more productive. Best of all, your customers will reap the benefits. If your current organization has difficulty measuring and tracking employee engagement and performance, then consider technology tools like human capital management software.

RELATED: 10 tips for retaining top IT talent

Frightening technology trends
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Multiple generations in the workforce

We currently have the highest number of generations in the workforce, with four age groups trying to work together at the same time. CIOs are tasked with learning the preferences and nuances of Matures/World War II, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y/Millennials, which all pose different security threats for an organization.

It is important to support all generations, including their personal preferences and natural tendencies, to ensure everything from confidential printed documents to mobile applications stored on personal devices remain secure.

Frightening technology trends
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Shifts in compliance

With a newly elected US President entering the White House in January, US compliance regulations could change, meaning you must be prepared to quickly shift gears to remain compliant. Add to this ever-changing global legislation, especially post-Brexit, and the entire C-suite is legitimately concerned over remaining compliant and avoiding legal ramifications for not doing so.

The first step to success is rolling out a compliant global workforce management strategy. There are many things to consider, but organizations should stick to three key areas: effective data management, employee and manager friendly self-service, and a strong partner or solutions provider.

Migrating to the cloud
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Migrating to the cloud

Businesses are becoming comfortable with migrating away from the security of physical servers and towards the benefits and flexibility of virtual servers. Security concerns are paramount for those that choose to employ could-based solutions, and problems such as unauthorized access or hijacking of accounts give CSOs a reason to proceed with caution.

Despite the risks, however, many organizations utilize cloud services or are planning to implement some type of cloud services solution in 2017. This is due to the potential increase in revenue, reduction in IT costs and business benefits, which are too great to ignore. Carefully evaluate cloud vendors, and select the one that eases your fears the most.

RELATED: 9 data security tips for cloud migration

Getting buy-in on hyperconvergence
Getting buy-in on hyperconvergence

Hyperconvergence offers the ability to integrate computer, storage, networking and virtualization resources in a software-centric infrastructure, allowing these technologies to be managed as a single system.

So why is hyperconvergence causing concern? For those planning to employ this type of solution, they must first evaluate the organization’s current system strengths and weaknesses and address any problems prior to making the decision. Old software may not run on new platforms; a concerted effort is required for testing and validation, which may add to the overall cost of this clever new technology.