AT&T and Verizon IPhone Plans Compared

Many of you probably consider an Apple-Verizon deal the second coming of the iPhone. Perhaps you've suffered on AT&T since June 29, 2007, or maybe you've been biding your time with that dilapidated Motorola RAZR, waiting for the day the iPhone was to be liberated. Well, that day has come, so we did your Verizon iPhone homework for you to see how the carrier compares against AT&T, besides offering a potentially more reliable network.

By David Chartier
Thu, February 03, 2011

Macworld — Many of you probably consider an Apple-Verizon (VZ) deal the second coming of the iPhone. Perhaps you've suffered on AT&T since June 29, 2007, or maybe you've been biding your time with that dilapidated Motorola (MOT) RAZR, waiting for the day the iPhone was to be liberated. Well, that day has come, so we did your Verizon iPhone homework for you to see how the carrier compares against AT&T, besides offering a potentially more reliable network.

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I'll break down the carriers's voice, SMS, and data plans separately, since there's a lot to digest here. As the carriers offer so many voice plans in both individual and family flavors, I'm only covering the first three of each, in order to keep things simple. Besides, if you need more than 1500-2000 minutes, you're probably used to doing some extra homework anyway.

Voice plans

The carriers are neck and neck when it comes to their introductory voice plans for individuals, starting with 450 minutes at $40 per month and pacing each other up through the "unlimited" tier, which you can see below.

Family plans are where things get more interesting. Even though Verizon is the nation's largest network by sheer subscriber numbers and it offers the same "call anyone else on our network for free" feature, the abundance of minutes on its voice plans here seem to assume that families are frequently going to call non-Verizon customers.

AT&T's family plans start at 550 minutes for $60 per month, but Verizon's begin with 700 minutes for $70, and head ever more upwards from there. Keep in mind, these plans include the minimum two lines to qualify as family plans, and both carriers allow up to five lines on a family account.

Text messaging plans

Verizon and AT&T differ on SMS and data plans as well, and AT&T changed its plans after Verizon announced it was getting the iPhone. Both carriers used to start at $5 per month, and at that price, Verizon one-upped AT&T by offering 50 more messages.

Individual voice plans

minutes/price per month

minutes/price per month

minutes/price per month

Verizon

450/$40

900/$60

Unlimited/$70

AT&T

450/$40

900/$60

Unlimited/$70

Family voice plans

minutes/price per month(two lines)

minutes/price per month(two lines)

minutes/price per month(two lines)

Verizon

700/$70

1,400/$90

2,000/$100

AT&T

550/$60

700/$70

1,400/$90

SMS plans

text messages/price per month

text messages/price per month

text messages/price per month

text messages/price per month

Verizon

250/$5

500/$10

5,000/$20

Family unlimited/$30

AT&T

1,000/$10

Unlimited/$20

Family unlimited/$30

But AT&T scrapped its two introductory SMS plans ($5 for 200 and $15 for 1,500) and now starts at a $10 plan for 1,000 messages. That means AT&T's introductory SMS plan is now twice as expensive as Verizon's, but it offers twice as many messages as Verizon's $10 plan. Prices remain neck and neck between the carriers for unlimited messaging on individual and family plans.

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Originally published on www.macworld.com. Click here to read the original story.
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