Avaya Extends 'Private Cloud' Capabilities to Campus Networks

Avaya is taking its data center architecture to the enterprise campus, with the goal of creating "private clouds."

By Jim Duffy
Tue, February 22, 2011

Network World — Avaya is taking its data center architecture to the enterprise campus, with the goal of creating "private clouds."

The company this week will announce plans to add its Virtual Enterprise Network Architecture (VENA) software to switches targeted at campus networks. Avaya's Ethernet Routing Switch 8600 and 8800 series systems will take on VENA in release 7.1 of the switch software, which Avaya says will allow campus users to more easily install, provision and manage applications and services.

Avaya rolled out VENA for data centers last year. The software supports the emerging IEEE 802.1AQ Shortest Path Bridging standard for deploying multiple active paths in a data center switching fabric.

DETAILS: Avaya unveils switching blueprint for virtual data centers

Shortest Path Bridging is an extension to the Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol that uses a link state routing protocol to allow switches to learn the shortest paths through an Ethernet fabric and dynamically adjust to topology changes.

VENA will allow data center users and now campus network users to configure a "Virtual Services Fabric" that Avaya says enables one-touch provisioning of network services. This is intended to create a "private cloud" that simplifies access to content and applications. It is also designed to eliminate human error in manual provisioning or adding, deleting or changing applications in a virtualized environment.

VENA is already shipping on Avaya's VSP 9000 data center switch. This week it is now available on the ERS 8800 and 8600.

As for future products, Avaya is developing a range of top-of-rack data center switches that will support VENA. They are expected at midyear, says Steve Bandrowczak, vice president and general manager of Avaya Data Solutions.

Avaya is also developing a "baby brother" to the VSP 9000 switch for smaller data center and campus core networks, Bandrowczak says. And the company plans to unveil a series of campus products this year that will extend the VENA fabric deeper into the campus and out to the branch edge.

Read more about data center in Network World's Data Center section.

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