Tablets in 2012: What to Expect

What will tablets look like in the coming year? Tablets are out of their infancy and moving into adolescence--which means that we can expect big changes ahead as tablets' design and components improve.

By Melissa J. Perenson
Thu, December 08, 2011

PC World — What will tablets look like in the coming year? Tablets are out of their infancy and moving into adolescence--which means that we can expect big changes ahead as tablets' design and components improve.

Slideshow: Hottest Tablets for Your Holiday Wishlist

Tablet operating systems will see some new blood, too, with the introduction of Android 4.0 and Windows 8. How will these changes manifest? Let's start with design.

Lighter and Thinner Tablets

Next year you can expect tablets to become even lighter and thinner than they are now. Actually, the shift has already begun: For 10-inch-class tablets, 1.2 to 1.3 pounds is shaking out as the new normal weight (down from 1.5 to 1.6 pounds as the norm in 2011), and 0.3 to 0.4 inch is becoming the new standard in thickness (down from 0.5 inch).

And those numbers should edge lower still, especially after Android manufacturers see what design leader Apple has in store for its iPad 3, which is widely expected to appear sometime in the first quarter of 2012.

Now that the rush to get a first tablet to market is past, manufacturers will likely turn their attention to the nitty-gritty details--display quality, text rendering, speakers, infrared ports for using a tablet as a remote control--as they try to get right in 2012 what they fumbled on during their first time out. We'll continue to see a wide array of screen sizes--from 7 inches to 10.1 inches--simply because consumers haven't yet shown enough of a preference to eliminate some of the middle sizes.

Additionally, we'll continue to see prices push down, thanks in part to models like the Amazon Kindle Fire--a 7-inch tablet that sells for $199, which is just a few dollars below Amazon's cost. Nvidia's CEO reportedly expects that prices for tablets using Nvidia's Tegra 3 system on a chip will drop to $299 by mid-2012.

Quad-Core Chips

Nvidia launched the Tegra 3 platform in November. Previously known as "Project Kal-El," the Tegra 3 packs in a quad-core ARM Cortex A9 CPU, a fifth "low-power" core for handling secondary tasks (such as playing music), and a 12-core GeForce GPU for graphics-intensive rendering. With quad-core chips, tablets should become more-capable performers that compete better with laptops than they do today.

The Asus Transformer Prime seems poised to be the first tablet to market to include Tegra 3. The Transformer Prime is a slimmer and redesigned version of the first-gen Eee Pad Transformer. The Prime is due to ship in December with an expected price of $500 for a model with 32GB of storage.

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