Energy Star 2.0 for Servers Coming in November

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week released the third draft of the Energy Star 2.0 specification for servers, which is expected to be finalized on Nov. 9.

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Fri, August 24, 2012

IDG News Service (New York Bureau) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency this week released the third draft of the Energy Star 2.0 specification for servers, which is expected to be finalized on Nov. 9.

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The specification is expected to be implemented in servers on Aug. 13 next year, according to the draft specification documents. The new specification is the successor to Energy Star 1.0 for servers that went into effect in May 2009. Companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Dell and IBM offer servers that qualify under the Energy Star 1.0 specification guidelines.

The Energy Star program is widely used in PCs, monitors, light bulbs, refrigerators and dozens of other products, with servers being a recent addition. The Energy Star specification rates power-efficient products and helps customers make effective purchase decisions. Products are typically identified with an Energy Star label.

The first version of Energy Star for servers that went into effect in 2009 took basic rack and tower server configurations into account, and set up guidelines for future specifications. The Energy Star 2.0 specification currently under consideration covers server types and processor technologies not considered in the first specification.

For example, Energy Star 2.0 now covers blade servers, which were left out of the first version due to the complexity involved in defining the configuration of blades, which are highly scalable depending on processing needs. The new specification also covers graphics processors (GPUs), which are being increasingly used in data centers to speed up math and scientific tasks. GPUs were not prominent in servers at the time of the Energy Star 1.0 specification, and now some of the world's fastest computers deploy clusters that combine CPUs with GPUs for fast task execution. Also being taken into account in the new Energy Star specification are the power-efficiency attributes of storage systems inside servers.

Server architecture has also been changing over the years, with many server vendors installing proprietary technology to manage, monitor and cap server power usage. HP, for example, has installed sensors and embedded hardware in its latest Proliant Gen8 servers to identify overutilized servers based on location, power, workload and temperature data. System administrators can redirect workloads from overutilized servers to other systems to ensure data centers are operating at peak efficiency. Dell has also implemented similar technology in its new PowerEdge servers.

Energy Star for servers could be important given that servers are progressively consuming more of the nation's power, and given that half of the data center costs are tied to power and cooling, said Nathan Brookwood, principal analyst for Insight 64.

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