The 10 Most Common Mobile Security Problems and How You Can Fight Them

When it comes to security, most mobile devices are a target waiting to be attacked. That's pretty much the conclusion of a report to Congress on the status of the security of mobile devices this week by watchdogs at the Government Accountability Office.

By Michael Cooney
Wed, September 19, 2012

Network World

smartphones, tablets, mobile security
When it comes to security, most mobile devices are a target waiting to be attacked. That's pretty much the conclusion of a report to Congress on the status of the security of mobile devices this week by watchdogs at the Government Accountability Office.

Combine the lack of security with the fact that mobile devices are being targeted by cybercriminals and you have a bad situation. For example, the number of variants of malicious software aimed at mobile devices has reportedly risen from about 14,000 to 40,000 or about 185% in less than a year, the GAO stated.

IN THE NEWS: Watchdogs say tons of issues remain before unmanned aircraft can fly free in USA

MORE: Insider security threat gets a serious look by US security agencies

"Mobile devices face an array of threats that take advantage of numerous vulnerabilities commonly found in such devices. These vulnerabilities can be the result of inadequate technical controls, but they can also result from the poor security practices of consumers," the GAO stated. "Private [companies] and relevant federal agencies have taken steps to improve the security of mobile devices, including making certain controls available for consumers to use if they wish and promulgating information about recommended mobile security practices. However, security controls are not always consistently implemented on mobile devices, and it is unclear whether consumers are aware of the importance of enabling security controls on their devices and adopting recommended practices."

The GAO report came up with a list of mobile vulnerabilities it says are common to all mobile platforms and it offered a number of possible fixes for the weaknesses: From the report:

* Mobile devices often do not have passwords enabled. Mobile devices often lack passwords to authenticate users and control access to data stored on the devices. Many devices have the technical capability to support passwords, personal identification numbers (PIN), or pattern screen locks for authentication. Some mobile devices also include a biometric reader to scan a fingerprint for authentication. However, anecdotal information indicates that consumers seldom employ these mechanisms. Additionally, if users do use a password or PIN they often choose passwords or PINs that can be easily determined or bypassed, such as 1234 or 0000. Without passwords or PINs to lock the device, there is increased risk that stolen or lost phones' information could be accessed by unauthorized users who could view sensitive information and misuse mobile devices.

* Two-factor authentication is not always used when conducting sensitive transactions on mobile devices. According to studies, consumers generally use static passwords instead of two-factor authentication when conducting online sensitive transactions while using mobile devices. Using static passwords for authentication has security drawbacks: passwords can be guessed, forgotten, written down and stolen, or eavesdropped. Two-factor authentication generally provides a higher level of security than traditional passwords and PINs, and this higher level may be important for sensitive transactions. Two-factor refers to an authentication system in which users are required to authenticate using at least two different "factors" something you know, something you have, or something you are before being granted access. Mobile devices can be used as a second factor in some two-factor authentication schemes. The mobile device can generate pass codes, or the codes can be sent via a text message to the phone. Without two-factor authentication, increased risk exists that unauthorized users could gain access to sensitive information and misuse mobile devices.

Continue Reading

Originally published on www.networkworld.com. Click here to read the original story.
Our Commenting Policies