Why 2013 Is RIM's BlackBerry Year

The iPhone isn't that great and the Android OS is woefully insecure. Come Jan. 30, if mobile users take a hard look at their devices and then look at the new BlackBerry 10, RIM could be in for a windfall.

By Rob Enderle
Fri, December 28, 2012
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On top of this, the device market is highly fragmented, which makes the operating system hard to secure and explains why Android is a malware magnet. A few months ago, for example, McAfee attacked an Android phone, causing it to cycle until it overheated and failed catastrophically. The mere idea that a phone might catch fire in a plane or office, should it be widely believed, would crater Android sales.

News: Over Half of Android Devices Have Unpatched Vulnerabilities, Report Says

RIM, like Apple and Microsoft, operates in a way that promotes apps that people buy and focuses on making products secure. As a result, BlackBerry devices are likely to be favored by those abandoning Android.

Enter BlackBerry 10 to Save the Day?

I've had some time to talk to RIM about its upcoming platform, and it appears to address each one of these shortcomings with a vengeance. BlackBerry 10 is based on an OS that is used to operate machinery. RIM started with a business oriented core and then addressed consumer needs—as opposed to the more common approach of putting a business fa├žade over a device that was targeted first at consumers.

If the market spits up Apple and Android devices for their inability to meet business user needs, RIM stands alone—or will, on Jan. 30, 2013 and the days that follow the BlackBerry 10 launch—as the company ready to embrace them. This is an unprecedented opportunity. As a result, 2013 could be an amazing year for RIM.

Rob Enderle is president and principal analyst of the Enderle Group. Previously, he was the Senior Research Fellow for Forrester Research and the Giga Information Group. Prior to that he worked for IBM and held positions in Internal Audit, Competitive Analysis, Marketing, Finance and Security. Currently, Enderle writes on emerging technology, security and Linux for a variety of publications and appears on national news TV shows that include CNBC, FOX, Bloomberg and NPR.

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