Your Facebook Friends May be Evil Bots

How safe is your online social network? Not very, as it turns out. Your friends may not even be human, but rather bots siphoning off your data and influencing your decisions with convincing yet programmed points of view.

By Eagle Gamma
Mon, April 08, 2013

InfoWorld

Facebook
How safe is your online social network? Not very, as it turns out. Your friends may not even be human, but rather bots siphoning off your data and influencing your decisions with convincing yet programmed points of view.

A team of computer researchers at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of British Columbia has found that hordes of social bots could not only spell disaster for large online destinations like Facebook and Twitter but also threaten the very fabric of the Web and even have implications for our broader economy and society.

[ The Web browser is your portal to the world -- as well as the conduit that lets in many security threats. InfoWorld's expert contributors show you how to secure your Web browsers in this "Web Browser Security Deep Dive" PDF guide. ]

Four UBC scientists designed a "social botnet" -- an army of automatic "friends." A botmaster herds its troop of social bots, each of which mimics a person like you and me. The researchers then unleashed the social botnet on an unsuspecting Facebook and its billion-plus profiles.

These social bots masquerade as online users, adding posts that seem like they came from real people. But they secretly promote products or viewpoints, and some you might friend use their new connections to siphon off your private information. When coordinated by a botmaster, these social bots can wreak havoc and steal information at a massive scale.

Traditional botnets don't pose a threat to social networks such as Facebook, where users can easily discriminate between artificial and real people. But the social bots tested at UBC imitated people well enough to infiltrate social networks.

That's not such a big issue with only one fake profile, but if the programmer can control hundreds or thousands of them, then it becomes possible to saturate large parts of the system, to gain access to massive amounts of private data, and to wreck the security model that makes online social networks safe.

Furthermore, because so many services build on top of social networks, the risk runs deeper. Many technologies, including data sharing and backups, integrate with sites like Facebook. Their authentication schemes rely on the implicit trust network that social bots are designed to break into.

The UBC researchers came up with a program that creates Facebook profiles and friends regular users. With the right techniques, it's easy for a program to add people on Facebook as friends. The results surprised the UBC team: "We saw that the success rate can be up to 80 percent. That was quite impressive," says researcher Kosta Beznosov.

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