The 5 Best Things About Google's Nexus 5

It's hard to stand out in the crowded smartphone market these days, but CIO.com's Al Sacco spotlights five key reasons Google's new Nexus 5 Android phone is in a class by itself.

By
Mon, November 04, 2013

CIO — Last week, Google made its brand-new Nexus 5 Android smartphone official, putting an end to weeks of leaks and countless rounds of rumors.

 Google's Nexus 5
Google's Nexus 5

The Nexus 5, now the hottest Android phone and one of the most notable smartphones available today, is listed for purchase on the Google Play store. I'm an Android user, and like my fellow Android fans, I'm anxious to get my hands on the new Nexus. I requested a review unit, but Google tells me its allotment of evaluation device is exhausted. I just bought an iPhone, and I also have a number of newish Android devices, so I'm holding off on the Nexus purchase, at least for a little while.

But that doesn't mean I haven't careful considered and assessed the Nexus 5. Here are the five best things about Google's Nexus 5 - the five things that will very likely make resisting the new Nexus a losing battle for me.

1) Nexus 5, Android 4.4 'KitKat' and Software Updates

The single best thing about the Nexus 5, and all Google Nexus devices, is the immediate access users get to Android software updates just as soon as they become available. Nexus Android software comes directly from Google. As such, it doesn't need any carrier approval - and it doesn't have any of the often-cumbersome features carriers build onto Android to make it unique. That means Nexus users are always first to get new Android features, functionality and fixes.

The Nexus 5 is also the first Android device to run the latest Android software v4.4 'KitKat,' which packs a handful of cool new features. (Find out more about Android KitKat on Google's site.)

2) Nexus 5 Contract-Free Pricing

Google makes it simple to circumvent the wireless carrier when purchasing the Nexus 5; the device is available contract-free via the Google Play Store. Its price is very reasonable for an off-contract, unsubsidized smartphone. The 16GB version costs $350, and the 32GB Nexus 5 goes for $400. In comparison, the T-Mobile version of Apple's new iPhone 5s, off contract, sells for $650 (16GB); $750 (32GB); and $850 (64GB). And AT&T sells the unsubsidized Samsung Galaxy S4 for $640 (16GB) and $695 (32GB).


 Google's Nexus 5
Google's Nexus 5 (sides)

The new Nexus 5 is without a doubt one of the cheapest and best options for people looking to purchase an unlocked, unsubsidized device that can be used on multiple wireless carriers and networks.

Continue Reading

Our Commenting Policies