French government sub-CA issues unauthorized certificates for Google domains

The certificates were used to inspect encrypted traffic on a private network, Google said

By Lucian Constantin
Mon, December 09, 2013

IDG News Service — An intermediate certificate authority (CA) registered to the French Ministry of Finance issued rogue certificates for several Google domains without authorization.

Google detected the use of the unauthorized certificates and launched an investigation Dec. 3, Adam Langley, a security engineer at Google, said Saturday in a blog post.

The intermediate CA that issued the rogue certificates linked back to the Agence nationale de la sA(c)curitA(c) des systA"mes d'information (ANSSI), a French national agency that protects government systems against cyberattacks and also operates the French government's public key infrastructure and root certificate authority called IGC/A.

Web browsers use a chain of certificates to determine if a secure website is authentic. Fake SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificates are used by hackers, but they also are sometimes used for internal surveillance purposes that do not have nefarious aims, such as the case with the French Ministry.

An intermediate or subordinate CA certificate inherits the authority of the root CA that issued it and can be used to sign certificates for any domain names that would be trusted in all browsers, unless certain technical restrictions are put in place.

According to Langley, Google immediately blocked the misused intermediate CA certificate -- and the certificates it issued -- in Google Chrome and alerted ANSSI and other browser vendors.

The intermediate CA certificate involved in the incident had been issued to the Direction gA(c)nA(c)rale du TrA(c)sor, the Treasury department of the French Ministry of Finance, and its use to sign certificates for domain names that don't belong to the French administration was the result of human error, ANSSI said in a statement on its website.

"The mistake has had no consequences on the overall network security, either for the French administration or the general public," ANSSI said. "The aforementioned branch of the IGC/A has been revoked preventively."

ANSSI found that the intermediate CA certificate had been used in a commercial device to inspect encrypted traffic on a private network with the knowledge of the network's users, Langley said.

ANSSI can confirm the Google statement, spokeswoman ClA(c)mence Picart, said Monday via email. "This use is clearly against the policy of the IGC/A."

The incident follows a similar case late last year when a subordinate CA certificate issued by a Turkish certificate authority called Turktrust to the Municipality of Ankara was installed in a firewall appliance and was used to inspect SSL traffic. In February 2012, Trustwave, another CA trusted by browsers, publicly admitted to issuing a sub-CA certificate to a third-party company so it could inspect SSL traffic passing through its corporate network.

Continue Reading

Our Commenting Policies