Republicans Question Coverage Under Healthcare.gov

Lawmakers suggest more US residents will lose insurance coverage than will sign up with the website

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Wed, December 11, 2013

IDG News Service (Washington, D.C., Bureau) — About 365,000 U.S. residents have signed up for new health insurance through HealthCare.gov and other means, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced, but Republican lawmakers questioned whether millions of people would lose existing coverage by Jan. 1.

Health coverage enrollment numbers rose significantly in November, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told a congressional committee Wednesday, but enrollments are running far behind HHS projections made before the flawed Oct. 1 launch of HealthCare.gov.

HHS is seeing "very, very positive trends" with enrollments, Sebelius said during a U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee hearing. "There is tremendous interest," she said. "They're eager for information, and they're desperate, many people are, for affordable coverage that they've never had before in their lives."

Sebelius agreed with lawmakers that the troubled launch of HealthCare.gov has led to a slower-than-expected enrollment pace, with internal projections from September expecting 3.3 million people to enroll in insurance coverage by the end of the year.

Asked if she should have delayed the launch of HealthCare.gov, Sebelius declined to offer a direct answer, but said that in hindsight she would have liked more time for testing the website. The first weeks of HealthCare.gov ended up being "beta testing," she said. "I certainly wish we could've saved millions of people a very frustrating experience, and had a smoother technology launch."

Republican lawmakers questioned whether more U.S. residents would lose coverage than sign up as the Affordable Care Act forces insurance carriers to dump some plans that don't comply with coverage requirements. Throughout the year, President Barack Obama promised that people who liked their current plans could keep them under the law, but Republicans have pointed to estimates that more than 5 million U.S. residents will lose old coverage.

"We are at a point where, come Jan. 1, 2014, millions more people will have lost coverage than signed up because of the health care law," Committee Chairman Fred Upton, a Michigan Republican, said earlier this week. "Of all the Americans who have been affected by the law, the vast majority are now without health coverage this holiday season and worried if they will be able to afford a new plan."

Democrats on the committee disputed the Republican numbers, saying many people are finding better coverage for cheaper prices through the new plans available through the Affordable Care Act. Some Republicans have demanded that their constituents be allowed to keep health insurance that doesn't cover hospitalization, said Representative Frank Pallone, a New Jersey Democrat.

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