Mindspeed Acquisition Fuels Intel's Hopes for Bigger Network Role

The company's wireless access technology will it play across mobile networks, Intel said

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Tue, December 17, 2013

IDG News Service (San Francisco Bureau) — Intel's acquisition of mobile network assets from silicon vendor Mindspeed Technologies will give the chip giant what it needs to extend the Intel architecture throughout mobile operator networks, helping the carriers upgrade hardware and roll out new services more quickly, according to Intel.

Intel announced on Monday that it would acquire the wireless access business of Mindspeed, known for chips that power small cells. It didn't disclose the price but said the deal is likely to close in the first quarter of next year. The rest of Mindspeed is being acquired by network chip maker M/A-COM Technology Solutions Holdings for US$272 million.

As with other areas of IT infrastructure, Intel has begun making inroads into service-provider networks. Standard Intel-architecture chips already power application processing within those networks, as well as control functions and processing of IP (Internet Protocol) packets, said Steve Price, general manager of Intel's communications infrastructure division. Intel's most recent advances have been into packet processing, where a single Intel core could only move 250,000 packets per second about four years ago and now can handle 20 million packets per second, according to Price.

With the Mindspeed assets, Intel will gain technology for the very edge of mobile systems, the radio-access networks (RANs) where signals from client devices hits cellular base stations and is converted into packets, Price said. This so-called baseband processing today typically is done by DSPs (digital signal processors). Intel envisions a "cloud RAN" architecture where RAN functions are carried out on pooled computing resources. Mindspeed's technology will help Intel get into this area with full-size macro cells as well as with small cells, he said.

Mobile networks have mostly been the realm of specialized hardware platforms, which are updated less often than Intel's and are more time-consuming to program for, Price said. With Intel chips for all parts of a carrier's network, equipment vendors will be able to refresh their systems with higher performance each year and offer a consistent architecture across the network, according to Intel. The company is even working on optimizations between its chips for mobile devices and for networks, Price said.

With networks built with Intel chips from end to end, it will be easier to realize intelligent, software-driven networks that can make more efficient use of strained resources, Price said. As mobile demands grow, this will be essential.

"If the operator doesn't change the way they're building networks, then our user experience is going to be compromised," Price said.

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