Vigo Bluetooth Device Nudges You Awake, Saves You From Dozing Off

Inconvenient sleepiness--the kind that hits you when you're driving home at the end of the day, or during an entirely-too-long earnings call--is what Vigo has called to battle. Vigo's new wearable device sees you when you're sleeping and knows when you should be awake.

By Leah Yamshon
Thu, January 23, 2014

IDG News Service — "When do we get drowsy when we don't want to be?" asks Jason Gui, co-founder and CTO of startup company Vigo. Well, I can think of tons of times where I may have accidentally nodded off a bit when I shouldn't have, which resulted in missing important information or subjecting myself to embarrassment (sorry, strangers sitting next to me on MUNI).

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Inconvenient sleepiness--the kind that hits you when you're driving home at the end of the day, or during an entirely-too-long earnings call--is what Vigo has called to battle.

This new wearable device, also called Vigo, is available for pre-order through Kickstarter. It tracks your eye movement and gives you a gentle nudge when it thinks you're getting too sleepy, recording your alertness and putting you back on track when you start to lose focus. The compact Vigo is only a little longer than your average Bluetooth headset, and you can use it to answer calls as well, with a comfortable earbud to keep it in place.

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Despite one of the co-founders suggesting you can use Vigo to stay awake during a boring date (which, seriously guys, is probably one of the rudest, most insulting things you could possibly do--I'm embarrassed that I even need to point that out for you), this technology is a shining example of how a wearable device can quantify data and make it actionable.

Gui, along with other founders Drew Karabinos and Jonathan Kern, all met while attending college at the University of Pennsylvania. For their senior engineering project, they decided to tackle alertness, an issue that plagues all college students (and, really, everyone else). They built a module that detects blink-rate, percentage and duration of eye closure, and other regular blinking patterns; there's a quick calibration process where the module learns as much as it can about your eye movements. When your blinking patterns change, this signals that you might be getting sleepy, and the device will alert you in an attempt to wake you back up.

Vigo in its current form is definitely not something you'd wear all day, and Gui stressedA that they'd like to find business partners and incorporate the blink-tracking module into other designs--perhaps in a pair of sunglasses, inside a construction helmet, or somewhere in a car. (Speaking of glasses, Vigo can be worn with most glasses already, as long as the frames and sides aren't too thick.) The Vigo team plans to experiment with makers from a variety of backgrounds to see how this technology could be applied.

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Originally published on www.techhive.com. Click here to read the original story.
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