Windows XP Isn't the Only Software Getting the Knife in 8 Weeks

Microsoft will call it quits not only on Windows XP in less than two months, but will also pull the plug on Office 2003 the same day.

By Gregg Keizer
Tue, February 11, 2014

Computerworld — Microsoft will call it quits not only on Windows XP in less than two months, but will also pull the plug on Office 2003 the same day.

After April 8, Office 2003, which debuted on Oct. 21, 2003, will no longer receive security updates, no matter which flavor of Windows it's running on.

Although Microsoft has made noise about ditching Windows XP, it has spoken infrequently about Office 2003's deadline. One of the few places on its website where it has talked about the latter's end-of-life, or EOL, is here.

"We're seeing the same kind of pockets as with XP," said Wes Miller, an analyst with Directions on Microsoft, of Office 2003 users in business. "A lot of people were on holding patterns with XP and didn't upgrade from Office 2003 to Office 2007."

Michael Silver of Gartner agreed. "There's a correlation between the success of Windows and the success of the Office that came out around it," he said. "Because of Vista, because of the timing, because of the costs, a lot of organizations skipped Office 2007."

When companies began migrating from XP to Windows 7 -- a process that continues even as the former's retirement deadline looms -- they also migrated from Office 2003 to Office 2010, even though a newer version of the latter has been available for more than a year.

"You might say the same [about a correlation] about Windows 8 and Office 2013," Silver said, adding that uptake for Office 2013 has been slow in enterprises. "It's because so many organizations are still in the midst of their Windows 7 migration [that they've ignored Office 2103]. They didn't want to change that Windows 7-Office 2010 plan, and decided to continue that."

But Silver pegged the prevalence of Office 2003 as more than the pockets Miller portrayed. "It's probably in the 30% to 40% range," Silver said.

Office 2003's successor, Office 2007, was bypassed for another reason: Some customers detested its new "Ribbon"-style interface, which was championed by Julie Larson-Green, then with the Office engineering group but subsequently an important executive in the Windows 7 and Windows 8 teams. She is now head of the company's Devices and Studios, responsible for the Surface line of hardware.

The Ribbon-ized Office 2007, and its follow-ups, Office 2010 and Office 2013, have continued to earn scorn from some long-time users. But the initial criticism about the user interface (UI) change died down much more quickly than that aimed at Windows Vista, which launched around the same time as Office 2007, or the UI complaints aimed now at Windows 8.

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Originally published on www.computerworld.com. Click here to read the original story.
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