Google Publishes Commitments it Made to Settle EU Antitrust Case

Google has revealed how it proposes to settle an antitrust case over search result ranking

By Peter Sayer
Fri, February 14, 2014

IDG News Service (Paris Bureau) — Google has done what the European Commission declined to do: publish the details of the latest commitments Google made in a bid to settle a long-running antitrust case involving its treatment of rival specialist search services, among other matters.

Last week, JoaquAn Almunia, European Commissioner for Competition, announced that he was inclined to accept Google's commitments and outlined their main features, including a promise to give comparable prominence to specialized search services that rival its own. If the Commission formally accepts Google's proposals, it will bring to an end an investigation begun in November 2010 after competitors complained the company was reducing the visibility in search results of websites and services that competed with its own.

In presenting the broad outlines of Google's commitments on Feb. 5, Almunia said he would not conduct a full "market test" which would have involved circulating it to around 125 interested parties and inviting them to submit comments, but would instead send the details only to the complainants. That angered some parties, including lobby groups Fairsearch and ICOMP, who wondered why there would be no formal market test procedure.

That angered some parties, including lobby groups Fairsearch and ICOMP, who wondered why there would be no market test. They also called for publication of the commitments, but Almunia declined, saying that the Commission would only publish them in full once it formally accepted them and that until then it was up to Google to decide whether to publish.

Around noon Brussels time on Friday, Commission spokesman Antoine Colombani took to Twitter to defend the Commission's decision only to share details of the commitments with companies that had filed formal complaints. Asked "Why the reticence about sharing?" he replied: "What reticence? We have presented publicly their key features and will now share them with complainants."

Four hours later, Google's senior vice president and general counsel, Kent Walker, ended the wait. On the company's European policy blog he announced the publication of what he called the "full text" of the company's commitments.

In fact, the 93-page document contains a number of redactions, including details of a parameter used to rank search results, the identities of two companies with customized contracts for Adsense For Search, and a proposal for modification of those contracts to comply with the other commitments.

In the document Google undertakes to make changes from the day the Commission makes the commitments legally binding on the company, or in some cases within three months of that date, and to commit to those changes for a period of five years and three months from that date.

Continue Reading

Our Commenting Policies