Chris Doig

Chris Doig graduated from the University of Cape Town, South Africa with a four-year bachelor of electrical engineering degree. While at university, he designed, manufactured and sold variometers for recreational aviation. After selling out the first production batch, he decided the market was too small. Chris then founded Cirrus Technology to supply information technology products to the corporate market in Cape Town. The focus at Cirrus was helping companies buy the best IT products for their particular needs. Cirrus also developed custom software for companies like the local 7-Eleven franchise holder and Metal Box, a British manufacturer of food cans.

In the 1990s, Chris took an opportunity to immigrate to the United States with his family. He worked at a number of companies in technical and IT management roles: Seagate, Biogen Idec, Netflix, Boeing, Bechtel SAIC, Discovery Communications and several startups. At all of these companies, he saw the same problem occurring repeatedly: Software was bought without a thorough evaluation process. After going into production, buyers’ remorse would often set in when people realized the software simply was not a good fit for the real needs of the organization.

Having faced this same software selection problem while in an IT management role himself, Chris realized there was a gap in the market. This led him to found Wayferry in September 2010. Initially, Wayferry focused on developing a cloud-based product to help evaluate software. However, it became apparent that this was only a partial solution and the market wanted more. Chris pivoted the company to supply a full consulting service focused exclusively on helping clients evaluate and select the best-fit enterprise software. Today, Wayferry helps clients select products ranging from ERP, CRM and accounting systems to call center software, clinical trial management systems and many other types of enterprise tools. For him, the ultimate satisfaction is when clients report dramatically exceeding the expected ROI of the software purchase.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Chris Doig and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications Inc. or its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

The hidden costs of poor software purchasing exposed!

Conflict-of-interest traps ensnare enterprise software implementations

Conflict-of-interest traps ensnare enterprise software implementations

Avoiding these two conflict-of-interest situations helps ensure the software you select meets your needs and the implementation is completed on time and on budget.

Why software implementations are usually late and over budget

Why software implementations are usually late and over budget

Enterprise software implementations usually take substantially longer and cost more than planned. When going live they often cause major business disruption. Here's a look at the root cause of the problem, with suggestions for...

Avoid ambiguity when writing requirements for software purchases

Avoid ambiguity when writing requirements for software purchases

Ambiguous requirements can lead to purchasing software that doesn't meet expectations. Here are some simple techniques for avoiding ambiguities in your requirements.

Law firm uses OKRs to drive astonishing results and get things done

Law firm uses OKRs to drive astonishing results and get things done

In the corporate world, many decisions are made in meetings, but too often things fall between the cracks. Here's a look at how one law firm used new Workboard OKR (objectives and key results) software to solve the challenge of...

Five ways inadequate requirements wreak havoc with enterprise software purchases

Five ways inadequate requirements wreak havoc with enterprise software purchases

See how poor requirements analysis puts enterprise software purchases at risk of partial to outright failure...and how to fix the problem.

16 difficulties to avoid when purchasing enterprise software

16 difficulties to avoid when purchasing enterprise software

In spite of the time and money spent, few software deployments meet expectations. Why? This article examines the more common reasons why selecting software is so difficult, so these problems can be avoided.

Buying the best BPM for your needs

Buying the best BPM for your needs

Business process management software can be thought of as 'the oil that lubricates corporate machinery.' With dozens of competitors on the market, use the reverse-engineering technique to find the BPM software best suited to your...

Use reverse engineering to help users set requirements for big software purchases

Use reverse engineering to help users set requirements for big software purchases

Collecting detailed software requirements from users can be painfully difficult. See how rewriting features as requirements helps develop a comprehensive requirements list for selecting enterprise software.

The payoff from a rigorous software selection

The payoff from a rigorous software selection

With major software purchases, the key to maximizing success is preparation. Even if you already know what software you want, there are still numerous benefits to a rigorous evaluation & selection. And maybe the favored software is...

The enterprise software acquisition funnel

The enterprise software acquisition funnel

Like sales & marketing, software acquisition has a funnel. See how to use this funnel to reduce the pains so prevalent with major software purchases.

17 painful ways a major software purchase can go wrong

17 painful ways a major software purchase can go wrong

The pain of a major software purchase going wrong can lead to wishing the project had never been started. However, by then contracts are signed and it is too late to do anything about it. Read and be warned!

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