The Fate of Motorola's Now-Defunct Moto Q Pro Smartphone (or How Motorola Promised Me a Moto Q Pro for Months and Then Bailed)

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What follows is an account of my experience trying to obtain the Moto Q Pro mobile phones, as well a number of responses from Motorola that I received over the past half year regarding the discontinued Moto Q Pro:

This story begins last fall when rumors surrounding a Moto Q smartphone aimed at business users began surfacing on websites like EverythingQ.com and TheUnwired.net.  At this time, the smartphone space was still all abuzz over the standard Moto Q, and the idea of a Q phone meant for businesspeople had me curious to say the least—after all, CIOs, my readers, are the users Motorola was targeting with such a device.  As mentioned above, I had been thinking about doing a smartphone review in conjunction with a handful of CIOs, and the Moto Q Pro seemed like it could be a perfect fit.

Shortly thereafter, in early January, Motorola officially announced the Moto Q Pro, touting its improvements over the standard Q, including enhanced security software, extended battery life, document editing capabilities, direct shipment services, enterprise call center support, and remote data wipe and camera disablement capabilities.  Oh yeah, and it came in a nifty black casing with a blue Motorola logo—much cooler than the boring old gray Q.

So I reached out to Motorola and requested review units. The handset maker's PR team got back to me promptly and assured me that it would be glad to work with me on my review.  That was the second week of January.

Over the next three weeks, my request was passed from one Motorola PR flack to another, and each responded with their own assurances that they were working on getting the phones.  Then I was contacted by yet another PR rep, this time a woman who'd come to Motorola from the acquisition of Symbol Technologies.  She explained that both companies' PR departments were being reorganized.  This was the first time that I connected the delay in getting my review copies with the Symbol deal. Motorola's Symbol acquisition was initially announced in September of 2006 and was completed just one day after Motorola launched the Moto Q Pro.

By that time, I was frustrated with the whole charade. I'd already obtained review units of four other phones from Motorola's rival handset makers and had sent most of them out to my CIO reviewers so we could get started on the business-savvy smartphone review.  I tried everything to speed up the process, and I thought I made some progress when I was assured that the phones would be going out within the next few days.  But at the end of the first week in February, I still had no Moto Q Pro phones. And the Motorola PR person I was nagging every day had started to cite "availability issues." 

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