Dice: US IT Hiring Set to Rise in 2011

The story "Dice: US IT hiring set to rise in 2011," has been clarified to indicate that results cited were from two separate surveys. It was not clear from information provided by the company that the results were from two surveys. The first, second, fourth, seventh and 11th paragraphs have been clarified to indicate which results were cited. The paragraphs now read, in order:

The story "Dice: US IT hiring set to rise in 2011," has been clarified to indicate that results cited were from two separate surveys. It was not clear from information provided by the company that the results were from two surveys. The first, second, fourth, seventh and 11th paragraphs have been clarified to indicate which results were cited. The paragraphs now read, in order:

First:

Six in 10 hiring managers and technology recruiters expect to do more hiring in the first half of 2011 than in the previous six months, according to the latest Dice.com report on IT hiring plans.

Second:

Dice surveys human resource managers and recruiters of technology professionals across the U.S. every six months, and its parent company Dice Holdings also conducts surveys, the most recent of which indicates "slow gradual recovery in the labor market," said Scot Melland, chairman, president and CEO of Dice Holdings, which operates the Dice.com IT and engineering jobs and recruiting services website. Nearly half of the almost 850 respondents in the most recent Dice.com survey say they expect to increase hiring by at least 10 percent in the first half of 2011, with another third expecting increases of 11 percent to 20 percent, and 15 percent forecasting hiring 21 percent to 30 percent more technology workers.

Fourth:

Companies and recruiters are finding it challenging to recruit prospective employees who have the skill sets they need. "That was something that was surprising and a very good sign for the future," he said, adding that 38 percent of respondents in the most recent Dice Holdings survey said that it is taking them longer to fill positions now than compared to this time last year, and 52 percent of those said that is because they cannot find qualified professionals. In past surveys, concern about the state of the economy was a bigger factor than an inability to find qualified job candidates.

Seventh:

At the same time, survey respondents say that they are seeing, and expect to continue to see, more turnover in jobs, with more employees moving on to other opportunities, he said. The percentage of respondents to the most recent Dice Holdings survey who say that layoffs are not likely at their companies or at the companies they recruit for held steady at 66 percent, the same as in the previous six-month survey.

Eleventh:

And because 52 percent of respondents said that they expect salaries for new hires will be the same as last year, companies also may need to look at increasing pay to be competitive in a fiercer market for skilled IT pros, the Dice.com survey found.

NEW! Download the Fall 2018 digital issue of CIO