US Lawmakers Target Deep Packet Inspection in Privacy Bill

The story, "US lawmakers target deep packet inspection in privacy bill," which moved on the wire Thursday, included incorrect information about the companies that have experimented with deep packet inspection. The mistake was due to a reporting error. In addition, there was a typo in the fourth paragraph.

The story, "US lawmakers target deep packet inspection in privacy bill," which moved on the wire Thursday, included incorrect information about the companies that have experimented with deep packet inspection. The mistake was due to a reporting error. In addition, there was a typo in the fourth paragraph.

The fourth and fifth paragraphs have been corrected on the wire and now read:

Officials with Free Press, the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) and the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) all spoke in favor of online privacy legislation. "In our view, deep packet inspection is really no different than postal employees opening envelopes and reading letters inside," said Leslie Harris, president and CEO of CDT. "Consumers simply do not expect to be snooped on by their ISPs or other intermediaries in the middle of the network, so DPI really defies legitimate expectations of privacy that consumers have."

Comcast and Charter Communications, both cable-based broadband providers, have experimented with using DPI in conjunction with behavioral advertising, but panelists at the hearing said they knew of no U.S. ISP now using DPI that way. However, there are about a dozen companies offering DPI services to ISPs, said Ben Scott, policy director at Free Press.

Copyright © 2009 IDG Communications, Inc.

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