by Edward Prewitt

The State of the CIO 2003 Research: Overview

News
Apr 01, 20032 mins
CIO

The State of the CIO 2003, our second-annual exclusive survey of more than 500 IT executives, reveals much about the tensions of your job and the changes in your role. In a nutshell: Although CIOs in different sectors of the economy face different problems, you are, on the whole, responding to the economic downturn with an executive perspective.

Strategic thinking and planning has become more important than ever to CIO success. In recognition of the powerful effect that IT has on competitiveness today, you’re asking what you can do for the enterprise rather than just for your IT department. What’s more, you’re demanding that business unit heads assume that same perspective when they come to you asking for new capabilities. Resolving conflicting demands from the business units is one of your biggest challenges for the coming year, according to the survey. Another is aligning IT initiatives with business goals. You can compare your personal situation with a comprehensive, statistically valid composite of IT executives in our survey results.

So how can you meet the challenges ahead? Based on CIOs’ survey responses, CIO editors selected a group of leading CIOs and asked them what they considered critical to successful IT leadership. They identified six best practices that CIOs must follow to ensure that IT maximizes its value to the enterprise.

For a self-assessment tool that’s serious and at the same time slightly tongue-in-cheek, turn to our pull-out CIO quiz. Answer 10 questions to figure out where your focus falls: on cost control, growth or operational efficiency. Then turn to the section that corresponds with your agenda.

Your Salary
$222,388 Finance/Insurance
$187,000 All CIOs
$120,437 Government
Best- and Worst-Paying Industries
Your Boss Your 2003 IT Budget Your Most Critical Skills
78% 76% 66%
Communication Strategic Thinking Business Smarts
Twice as Many CIOs Now Report to CFOs The Well Isn’t Entirely Dry Technology Takes a Backseat