Using analytics to identify and predict patients’ physical health needs

A web-based tool that identifies and predicts patients most in need for therapy services in real time was born out of the recurring problem of missed therapy visits.

1 2 Page 2
Page 2 of 2

Dr. Krishnaj Gourab: Do you know what was the cost of treating massive acute myocardial infarction — heart attacks — in 1819? It is 0 dollars because all patients used to die. Today, the cost of treating these patients is probably thousands of dollars, but no one questions whether we should spend the money on this because the patient either lives or dies based on whether the correct treatment was provided. Now, in rehab, the outcomes are not that “alarming”. If a patient doesn’t receive adequate therapy, he or she stays in a nursing home, or doesn’t move well, there is a gradual decline of this patient’s function and ability. But that is something that is not immediately apparent to patients, families and policymakers. Many of the regulations don’t see the value of measurement of function and improvement of function. If tomorrow, there was a regulation that the patients are improving in function, and if you show me that, then you get reimbursement; if you don’t show that, you don’t get reimbursement, which is similar to meaningful use criteria, it would go a huge way in promoting measurement of function and appropriate rehabilitation interventions. There’s evidence in literature that shows function is related to many outcomes; how well your patient moves, can stand up, walk, etc, which is also very important to the patient. Our goal should be get patient back to normal functional status by giving him medical interventions as well as rehab interventions. Somehow the rehab interventions get shortsighted because the harm happens over a longer period and is not immediate.

If you have a dream state for the future of physical medicine, including movement and function, what would it be?

Dr. Krishnaj Gourab: My dream state would be rather than a healthcare system in which patient comes in once every month or three months, the physician’s office will have systems with analytic dashboards. For example: All of the patients enrolled in wellness will have their movements tracked using wearables; then the system would tell doctors to see the 10 patients who have shown a significant deterioration in function; then they can pick up the phone and talk to those patients. Let’s say Mr. Jones is feeling really fatigued when the doctor calls, and the doctor looks at the wearables data and says this person has increased in weight and has congestive heart failure. As a result, they could prescribe a diuretic before things get serious and the patient didn’t have to come in. That would be my dream state, but there is a lot of science that has to happen before we reach that state. But, again, we are closer than ever before.

Copyright © 2017 IDG Communications, Inc.

1 2 Page 2
Page 2 of 2
Download CIO's Roadmap Report: 5G in the Enterprise