New JMP version provides data scientists with more predictive modelling tools

John Sall
SAS

I’ve never seen any single software application as transformative to scientific learning as JMP Timothy Gardner, Riffyn

From Pleistocene fossils to infrared technology on a mission to map the surface of a near-Earth asteroid, JMP statistical discovery is helping scientists, engineers and other data analysts make a difference, says SAS, as it releases the latest version of the software.

“Our customers can explore and understand their data even more fully with JMP 15,” says John Sall, co-founder and executive vice president of SAS and head of the JMP business unit at SAS.

“And they get instant graphical gratification with new visualisation enhancements,” says Sall, in his keynote at the Discovery Summit conference.

With JMP Pro 15, SAS says data scientists will have more predictive modeling tools than ever.

SAS says it created JMPin 1989 to empower scientists, engineers and other data analysts to explore and analyse data visually and interactively.

Since then, SAS says JMP has grown from a single product into a family of statistical discovery tools, each one tailored to meet specific needs.

“I’ve never seen any single software application as transformative to scientific learning as JMP,” says Timothy Gardner, CEO and founder of Riffyn.

“With JMP you start seeing patterns and relationships in your data you never thought possible. It takes the guesswork and mystery out of statistics.”

“The higher the volume of data we collect, the greater the chance we will get some signals from them that add value and build knowledgehellip;. It can be complicated to visualise. I really like JMP for this, especially Graph Builder, which is very practical and efficient,” says Augustin Cathignol, principal engineer for product reliability and data Science, at Lynred. The latter designs high-performance infrared detector technology for probes traveling deep into space.

For Sherri Gust, founder and principal paleontologist at Cogstone, says the ability to interact with data is key.

“The interactivity is one of my favorite things about JMP. You can say, ‘I’d like to explore that more and then do this,’” says Gust, who is conducting research on Ice Age fossils at Rancho La Brea in California.

“JMP is what has helped us be able to see the big picture more clearly and in real-time,” notes Tyler Wise, project analyst for global business services at Diebold Nixdorf.

SAS
John Sall, co-founder and executive vice president of SAS

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