Remote work pressures Africa tech leaders to set MDM, BYOD policies

The move to remote work has put more pressure than ever before on tech leaders in business to establish mobile device management (MDM) and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies. BYOD is not for everyone — companies need to weigh pros and cons.

The COVID-19 pandemic has been the ultimate accelerant in changing business practices in sub-Sahara, forcing a mass move to remote work. As a result, there is more pressure than ever before on tech leaders in business to establish mobile device management (MDM) and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies.

During the pandemic, shifts in workplace culture that normally unfold over years happened in the space of a few weeks. Remote, asynchronous work quickly became the norm in Africa and around the world out of sheer necessity — and now, an increasing number of companies are announcing that this change is permanent and that their workforce will no longer need to come in to the office every day.

In fact, many companies are letting the lease expire on their physical offices, and embracing a new remote way of working. This means that management needs to establish BYOD and MDM policies.

No one remote device policy works for all

For small, agile organizations accustomed to change, the transition to remote or hybrid work has been relatively seamless. But more traditional, office-bound organizations like CCI were forced to scramble and adapt to the new normal. CCI is one of the largest business process outsourcing (BPO) operations in Africa. The company employs 10,000 agents who either work remotely from home, or from one of nine buildings in three cities to service local South African and international clients in Australia, Kenya, the UK and US.

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