John Belden

Contributor

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

As UpperEdge’s Project Execution Advisory Services Practice Leader, John Belden is responsible for the development and delivery of advisory services designed to maximize the value extracted from systems integrators and mitigate risks associated with IT-enabled transformations.

John’s current portfolio of client programs totals $1 billion in expected program costs. The heart of the practice is centered on risk mitigation with a focus on the assurance of operational continuity and harvesting the expected returns of IT-enabled transformations.

Prior to joining UpperEdge, John was a Vice President, responsible for the Timken Company’s Project ONE. This $220M program is recognized as one of the most successful deployments of SAP at a global manufacturing company delivering benefits that doubled the original business case. Prior to leading Project ONE, John was VP Information Technology leading the organization through a globalization initiative, integrating major acquisitions and putting in place Timken’s own offshore development center in the late 1990s.

John earned his B.A in Mathematics from Hiram College and M.S. in Computer Science from Kent State.

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