Mark MacCarthy

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Mark MacCarthy is senior vice president for public policy at the Software & Information Industry Association, the principal association for the software and digital content industries, and a leading authority on U.S. tech policy. On behalf of SIIA’s 800 member companies, MacCarthy directs a broad range of public policy initiatives, including in the areas of intellectual property, information privacy, economic growth, cybersecurity, cloud computing, international trade and the promotion of educational technology. He is also an adjunct faculty member at Georgetown University, where he teaches courses in information privacy and tech policy in the Communication, Culture, and Technology Program.

MacCarthy regularly speaks and writes on topics of software and data. He has served as a consultant on technology policy issues for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and for the Aspen Institute. MacCarthy holds a Ph.D in philosophy from Indiana University and an MA in economics from the University of Notre Dame.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Mark MacCarthy and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

The ethical challenges of AI

AI and the future of work

AI and the future of work

We need a strategic plan to meet the challenges.

Today’s competitive digital marketplace will drive policy changes

Today’s competitive digital marketplace will drive policy changes

After the Facebook hearings policymakers should remember that there’s plenty of room for new players in the digital marketplace

Working with our allies is the best way to persuade China to practice open trade and investment

Working with our allies is the best way to persuade China to practice open trade and investment

The administration’s announced tariff actions is a mistake.

Artificial intelligence policymaking is alive and well in Paris and Brussels

Artificial intelligence policymaking is alive and well in Paris and Brussels

The good news is that European policymakers are responding to the challenges posed by artificial intelligence (AI).

Breaking up is hard to do: Why the Bell System breakup isn’t a model for tech

Breaking up is hard to do: Why the Bell System breakup isn’t a model for tech

Today’s tech companies are not like the old Bell System.

What 'Ohio v. Amex' really means for tech

What 'Ohio v. Amex' really means for tech

It’s not the get out of jail card critics say it is.

Planning for artificial intelligence's transformation of 21st Century jobs,

Planning for artificial intelligence's transformation of 21st Century jobs,

Protected workers will embrace the change automation and AI bring, not fight it.

What is competition policy for?

What is competition policy for?

Regulators should focus on making markets work better for consumers.

The benefits of bigness: consumers can gain from large tech firms and market leaders

The benefits of bigness: consumers can gain from large tech firms and market leaders

A common misconception is that big businesses are bad businesses. In the case of tech firms, this is not always true, and there are many benefits to consumers that come from big firms.

Policy challenges of artificial intelligence

Policy challenges of artificial intelligence

Developments in artificial intelligence are a driver of new products and services that will improve the richness, variety and comfort of our lives, speed up productivity growth, and make consequential decisions fairer and more...

Unnecessary and counterproductive regulations don’t make good competition policy

Unnecessary and counterproductive regulations don’t make good competition policy

With increased criticism of tech companies’ size and power, it is important to note that unnecessary regulations would be counterproductive, causing more harm than good.

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