Rick Gillis

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

Rick Gillis has been involved in the" business of employment" since 1997 when he was instrumental in introducing the first local employment website to the greater Houston market. Since that time Rick has aggressively studied employment and the practice of job seeking from the perspective of both the employer and employee.

Rick has a “street-level” knowledge of the technological and mechanical aspects of the employment business to include resume development - specifically, his Short-Form resume format designed to navigate resume-filtering software; employment advertising; recruiting; pre-employment assessments; networking and social networking; age-discrimination issues; the human resources function; diversity considerations; staffing companies; web based applicant-tracking systems and, of course, Internet employment protocols. Rick is passionate about his topic - high energy, actionable, focused, motivating and on-point.

Rick is an in-demand speaker and consultant speaking not just on the various aspects of job search but also on talent management, employee engagement, promotion, transition and motivation.

Rick serialized his book PROMOTE! here on CIO. He also has published JOB!.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Rick Gillis and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Job seekers, get ready for the hiring season

Is writing that cover letter necessary?

Is writing that cover letter necessary?

Are cover letters necessary these days? That's up to the employer you're trying to get hired by. Read the job description carefully: a cover letter can be your first test as an employee.

Why you can't trust job search experts over (or under) 30

Why you can't trust job search experts over (or under) 30

Get the take on job search from someone who has been "in the trenches," and at the same time learn the latest, greatest techniques available to you. Explore the value in both ways before going all in.

The Business Case for Accomplishments: Enhancing the Bottom Line with a Company Wide Program

The Business Case for Accomplishments: Enhancing the Bottom Line with a Company Wide Program

Businesses are continuously seeking new methods of creating revenue. What if you were able to get more value from your existing employees? Implementing an accomplishments program company wide and using the information gathered to...

Promoting Yourself Over the Watercooler

Promoting Yourself Over the Watercooler

Your goal is to see that decision makers are aware of the value you bring to the organization. Casual encounters, even of the social media type, can be personal promotion opportunities. (Serialized from Rick Gillis' just-published...

Accomplishments Trump Discrimination on the Job

Accomplishments Trump Discrimination on the Job

Revenue matters more than age, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or any physical challenges. If you can make an employer money or save them money, you can get the job, earn the promotion or retain your position. (Serialized...

The Power of an Accomplishment is in Its Net Present Value to Your Employer

The Power of an Accomplishment is in Its Net Present Value to Your Employer

You go to work and you do a great job. Or so you think. It is in the eyes of your supervisor whether or not you are delivering value and results to the organization. (Serialized from Rick Gillis' just-published "PROMOTE!")

Discovering Your Accomplishments that Made a Difference

When you build your resume list of accomplishments, call your friends, your family, your former coworkers and your old bosses. Your actions may have gone deeper than you ever knew. (Serialized from the soon-to-be published, "PROMOTE!")...

You Can't Tell Your Boss What You've Done If You Don't Know What You've Done

You Can't Tell Your Boss What You've Done If You Don't Know What You've Done

The first step in developing your personal Accomplishments Inventory and Statement is to compile an exploratory list of those things you are proud to have achieved. (Serialized from the soon-to-be published, "PROMOTE!")

Quantify Your Value and Earn More

Quantify Your Value and Earn More

You were hired because someone believed you would produce more value for the organization than you would cost it. (Serialized from the soon-to-be published "PROMOTE!")

Professional Accomplishments: The Shortest Distance to Indispensable

Professional Accomplishments: The Shortest Distance to Indispensable

An inventory of real-world, valuable accomplishments will demonstrate your value to your organization. (Serialized from the soon to be published "Promote!")

Don't Let Supervisors Manage Your Career

Don't Let Supervisors Manage Your Career

You have a professional responsibility to share your value with those who can make a difference in your career: management. (Serialized from the soon to be published book, "Promote!")

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