Sue Weston

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

After 30+ years in corporate finance technology, Sue Weston is branching out to follow her passion, inspiring women to pursue careers in STEM. Based on her education, she is an industrial engineer, but her passion encompasses diversity and inclusion, creating a work place with gender equality.

Sue is an innovator with proven ability to deliver sustainable results through collaborative partnerships, creation of an inclusive workplace and the elimination of gender bias.

Sue holds an undergraduate degree in Industrial Engineering from Columbia University, and two masters degrees: one in Industrial Engineering from NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering and the second in Organizational Management from University of Phoenix.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Sue Weston and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Manage your unconscious bias

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Stress is an epidemic effecting over half the population. How you deal with it may impact your ability to be an effective manager.

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It takes more than hard work to advance your career. Build a team of trusted advisors consisting of a sponsor, a mentor and a coach. These roles are often confused, but each serves a different purpose.

Conversational intelligence

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Recognizing and responding consciously to gender-differentiated communications patterns can improve your conversational intelligence. By acting intentionally, using body language purposely and making conversations fact-based we begin...

3 steps to reduce bias

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This discussion suggests we need to change behavior across three dimensions: Have To, Ought To and Want To in order to reduce the effect of gender bias on decision making.

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